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Clod Roast

Chuck roast

Information for Clod Roast

Cut Ratings

Flavor 3 star
Tenderness 2 star
Value 4 star
Leanness 3 star

Typical Cooking Methods

Braise, Broil, Grill

Other Names for Clod Roast

Beef Chuck Shoulder Pot Roast, Shoulder Roast

Good Substitutes for Clod Roast

Arm roast or Bottom Round or Cross rib roast or seven bone roast

Traditional Dishes for Clod Roast

Pot Roast

Sous Vide Chuck Roast Recipes

View all Sous Vide Chuck Roast Recipes

Description of Clod Roast

The clod roast is taken from the chuck primal cut of the cow, which is the largest of the eight primal cuts. It is taken from the shoulder area and includes the primary five ribs. The chuck section contains lots of connective tissue, however it can be broken down by slow-cooking. A good thing about buying the different types of chuck roast is that it can be bought boned, rolled and tied or bone-in.

The clod roast can be tough but through proper cooking method, great flavor can be brought out. This is a boneless cut, found behind the shoulder area. The best part of this cut of beef is that it is economical. You can braise it in different sorts of liquids such as wine, beef stock or even water to bring different flavors in the meat. Make sure you cook it in a covered pot till it becomes completely tender.

This cut is perfect for making roast. In fact many of chuck beef cuts are especially famous for making pot roast. You can also use the clod roast to make stew. Trim this cut and simply cube it for your stew. Make sure you select a cut that has lot of marbling and connective tissues. When you prepare the stew, the connective tissue will melt which adds a great beefy flavor in your stew.