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Rib Steak

Beef rib steak

Information for Rib Steak

Cut Ratings

Flavor 4 star
Tenderness 3 star
Value 3 star
Leanness 2 star

Typical Cooking Methods

Broil, Grill, Pan Fry

Other Names for Rib Steak

Entrecote

Good Substitutes for Rib Steak

Club Steak, Rib-Eye Steak

Traditional Dishes for Rib Steak

Barbecue beef rib

Sous Vide Steak Recipes

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Description of Rib Steak

There are thirteen ribs in the cow altogether. The first five ribs are found in the chuck primal cut, while other seven ribs are found in the rib primal cut. The last rib, the thirteenth, is found in the short loin primal cut. The rib is located between the cow's shoulder and short loin section.

This part of the cow doesn't get any exercise, therefore all the cuts from this primal cut are very tender. In addition it has consistent marbling that indicates that the rib primal cut should be very flavorful.

The rib steak is obtained from the rib section. It is one of the most coveted steaks in the steakhouses. The bone in the rib steak is often left attached so that it brings more beefy flavor to the dish. Sometime rib steaks are "frenched" and have all its fats trimmed away. In such a steak, the bone is exposed around 1 to 3 inches.

The rib steak is versatile enough to be cooked in a lot of different methods. You will be able to identify this steak by its curved bone. The boneless version of the rib eye is more prevalent than the rib steak. However the rib steak is gaining popularity because it is superb in taste and has great texture. In the US, this cut is confused with the rib-eye steak many times but both cuts are different.

This cut is not only great for grilling but also for slow roasting. Make sure that you do not over cook it so you don't end up with a tough steak.