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Sous Vide Dulce de Leche Recipe

Caramel is Pam McKinstry's (of SVKitchen.com) favorite thing, especially combined with chocolate, but she likes it unadulterated, too, in all of its many forms.

Dulce de leche, Spanish for “sweet milk,” is on her list of must-have condiments. Pam always has a jar or two in her over-crowded fridge because it’s very versatile and great for last-minute desserts. Sometimes she'll treat herself with a spoonful right from the jar if there's nothing else on hand to satisfy a sudden caramel craving.

Gourmet specialty shops generally stock dulce de leche (it's fairly trendy these days), but it tends to be expensive. Ethnic markets also sell canned dulce de leche, but Pam finds this product exceptionally flat tasting, lacking the depth of flavor and intensity of high-end products.

Pam's long made her own version, having learned the trick while working in safari camp kitchens in Zambia. They used the dulce de leche to create a concoction called Banoffee Pie, which alternates caramel with layers of Marie biscuits, sliced bananas, and whipped cream.

But first, here’s how to make your own dulce de leche.

Pam says that making your own dulce de leche will not only save you money, but your sauce will be superior in taste and quality. And it’s so very simple! The slow, even heat of the sous vide machine is perfect for caramelizing the milk, and eliminates the possibility of scorching. The milk slowly transforms into a thick and luscious dessert sauce.

She's specified making the dulce de leche in glass jars (canning jars are perfect), but some people might make it in the original condensed milk packaging (remove the labels first). Beware, however: tin cans are coated with a protective liner that contains bisphenol A (BPA). Although the EPA reports that human exposure to BPA from can coatings is minimal and poses no known health risk, some consumers find it a concern. Also, some condensed milk brands warn not to heat the cans, so why take a chance?

The sous vide technique works perfectly well with either form, but it takes a few hours longer to caramelize in glass, because glass is a better insulator than metal.

Dulce de leche makes a perfect hostess or holiday gift, so think about filling your machine with 6 or more jars when you make this recipe. For a quick dessert, mix dulce de leche with crème fraîche and use it as a dip for strawberries.

Quick Dulce de Leche Tip

Mix one part dulce de leche to two parts crème fraîche or sour cream, whip with a fork until well blended, then use as a fruit topping.

Modernist Tools, Ingredients, and Techniques Used

If you would like more information about the modernist techniques, ingredients, and equipment used in the Sous Vide Dulce de Leche you can check out the following.

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Sous Vide Dulce de Leche

  • Published: April 1, 2012
  • By Pam McKinstry
  • Prep Time: 5 Minutes
  • Total Time: 13 to 15 Hours
  • Cooks: 185°F (85°C) for 13 to 15 Hours
  • Yields: 1.3 cups per can

Ingredients for Sous Vide Dulce de Leche

  • For the Sous Vide Dulce de Leche

  • 3 14-ounce cans sweetened condensed milk. You can cook more if you wish.

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Cooking Instructions for Sous Vide Dulce de Leche

For the Sous Vide Dulce de Leche

At least 13 to 15 hours before serving

Preheat the water bath to 185°F (85°C).

If desired, open the cans and transfer the condensed milk to sterilized 1/2-pint glass jars, leaving a 1/4 inch head space, and seal with tight-fitting lids. Alternately, remove the labels from the cans and leave them sealed.

Place the jars or cans in the water bath (Pam adds them while the machine is still preheating). Once the water reaches 185°F (85°C), cook the cans for 13 hours, or until you hear no liquid sloshing when the can is shaken. Cook the glass jars for 15 hours, or until the dulce de leche is thick and golden brown. (If the jar is only partially filled, the caramel will be cooked in less time. The jar will also float in the water bath, but that is not a problem.)

Remove the jars or cans from the machine and let them cool for about 20 minutes, then refrigerate the sauce. The dulce de leche will keep, chilled, for up to 3 months.

If you like this recipe you can get more than 85 other inspiring recipes to get you on your way to sous vide success. It's all in my best selling book Modernist Cooking Made Easy: Sous Vide - Get Your Copy Today!

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Sous Vide Dulce de Leche Recipe

PT13H 1 ⅓ cups per can Ingredients: 3 14-ounce cans sweetened condensed milk. You can cook more if you wish.
4.3889 stars - based on 18 reviews
Sous vide dulce de leche is a very convenient and quick to make treat.
1 Serving